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26 results in Philosophy Search again

Our philosophy classes welcome everyone- no background knowledge is required. Students are encouraged to share their ideas, developing skills in discussion, argument and questioning. Philosophy courses range from studying one specific philosopher to many -exploring their ideas and works both in the age which they lived, and their relevance for us today.

Branch Event: Great Philosophers: Part One Descartes and Locke View details

The modern period of philosophy began in the 17th Century and this day school is an introduction to some of the key elements in the thought of two of its great philosophers. The first is Descartes. The modern period begins with him. The second is the 17th/18th century English philosopher, John Locke.”

Branch Event: History of Philosophy 1: Socrates and Plato View details

In this study day we explore the ideas of Socrates and Plato - two of the seminal figures in the development of western philosophy. We will consider key elements in the ideas of both men, looking in particular at Socrates' pronouncements on ethics, and Plato's dialogues on the soul and the perfectly just city-state, as recorded in The Republic.

Britain After Brexit View details

We are living through a challenging and confusing time in British politics. This course will provide the chance to discuss and share ideas on the latest developments, including views from different sides of the political spectrum. We will use extracts from film, TV and the newspapers to consider the issues raised. Analysis of Brexit from a long term perspective will be considered alongside the latest news stories.

Continental Philosophy: Perspectives from Beyond the Channel View details

We will discuss crucial philosophical questions around the relationship between the individual and society. In particular, we will ask whether and how social structures affect one's identity, and whether and how the exercise of power in society affects one's conceptualisation of individuality and identity. To discuss these questions, we will look at the answers given by key Continental philosophers from the 20th and 21st century including Adorno, Foucault, Deleuze and Agamben.

Day School:Influential Philosophers from Aristotle to the Modern Era View details

This interactive, enjoyable and stimulating Philosophy study day would suit those who have attended the previous Influential Philosophers study day, as well as newcomers. We will consider another variety of key philosophers throughout the ages, exploring and evaluating their influential theories. A range of branches of philosophy will be included and fundamental philosophical concepts and terms introduced.

Democracy - what does it mean and is it a good idea? View details

'Undemocratic' is used to criticise decisions or how decisions have been made, but we don't often get beyond the criticism. This course is an opportunity to consider the different meanings of democracy - majority votes; meeting the needs and interests of the population; ensuring a positive outcome for the common good; holding those in power to account - and reasons which make democratic decisions legitimate or not. The course uses theories of democracy from Philosophy and Political Science and is not intended as a political platform. It will cover 1. the claims about legitimacy underlying judgments that a decision is 'undemocratic'; 2. the relationship between majority voting and legitimacy; 3.'stakeholder' democracy and interests; 4. meaningful and less meaningful participation; 5. genuine and 'manufactured' consensus; 6. the role of expertise in democracies.

Democracy - What Does It Mean, and Is It a Good Idea? View details

'Undemocratic' is used to criticise decisions or how decisions have been made, but we don't often get beyond the criticism. This course is an opportunity to consider the different meanings of democracy - majority votes; meeting the needs and interests of the population; ensuring a positive outcome for the common good; holding those in power to account - and reasons which make democratic decisions legitimate or not. The course uses theories of democracy from Philosophy and Political Science and is not intended as a political platform. It will cover 1. the claims about legitimacy underlying judgments that a decision is 'undemocratic'; 2. the relationship between majority voting and legitimacy; 3.'stakeholder' democracy and interests; 4. meaningful and less meaningful participation; 5. genuine and 'manufactured' consensus; 6. the role of expertise in democracies.

From Belief to Doubt: study of changes to ways of thinking View details

From Belief to Doubt :   A consideration of how  religious ,political  , scientific  and cultural  developments both influenced and were influenced by this change. Using the ideas of the French revolution as a jumping off point  the emphasis will be on the roots of the religious and ethical shifts in politics and attitudes as the modern UK  becomes multicultural. .  Resources will include novels, biography, diaries and selected historical and scientific texts.

Great Thinkers - Philosophy and Our World View details

This Philosophy course is called Great Thinkers. It is a course which takes in philosophy but also the many related areas that philosophy comments on (such as sociology, psychology, politics and many sciences). It takes the ideas and work of a specific thinker and uses these as a framework for discussion and examination -- with special relevance to how we live our lives in the 21st Century. The course takes in lots of discussion and is very participative.

How Democracy works - in practice View details

There has been much debate recently about the 'failure' or the 'crisis' of democracy. How true those claims are depends on what type of democratic decision-making is involved - from voting to consensus building. This course gives examples of different types of democratic participation including citizens' assemblies and other forms of 'deliberative' democracy and gives students the opportunity to practice some of these (in miniature). It will use examples from political research and is not intended as a political platform.