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21 results in Philosophy Search again

Our philosophy classes welcome everyone- no background knowledge is required. Students are encouraged to share their ideas, developing skills in discussion, argument and questioning. Philosophy courses range from studying one specific philosopher to many -exploring their ideas and works both in the age which they lived, and their relevance for us today.

Asking Philosophical Questions View details

Philosophical questions are distinctive, different from scientific or practical questions for example. Philosophy explores fundamental issues such as who we are (personal identity); what is moral; how best to organize human societies; what we can know; what is real. Each of these issues is examines in a particular 'branch' of Philosophy, such as philosophy of mind; ethics; political philosophy; theory of knowledge (epistemology); or metaphysics. This course provides an introduction to the questions and branches of Philosophy.

Asking Philosophical Questions - Knowledge and Reality View details

Philosophical questions are distinctive, different from scientific or practical questions for example. Philosophy explores fundamental issues such as what we can know and what is real. Each of these issues is examined in a particular 'branch' of Philosophy - the theory of knowledge (epistemology) and metaphysics. This course provides an introduction to these questions and branches of Philosophy.

Friends, Strangers and others View details

The course will start with an exploration of the meaning and value of friendship in ancient Greek philosophy. We will examine how useful it is to divide the world into 'people like us' and 'people not like us', and study descriptions of those 'not like us' across history; consider the theory that our sense of self is dependent on others (with the help of philosophical arguments from Hegel, Sartre and others); examine whether it makes sense to say that others may know better what is in someone's interest than the person him/herself; and examine features of a helpful attitude to conflict and disagreement- for example assuming that the other person/side have reasons for their views.

How to Think Like a Philosopher View details

Philosophy has distinctive ways of thinking, which can be learnt. This short course is an opportunity to acquire and practice key philosophical skills such as how to distinguish a good from a bad argument; how to examine assumptions; and how to make a judgement about whether conclusions follow.

In Introduction to Ethics View details

Ethical questions are often difficult, and it can be hard to know what is morally right in a situation. We all have to deal with these issues but philosophers have done this in a more systematic way than most of us are able to in everyday life. This course is an opportunity to gain greater clarity about what ethics is about - is it subjective ? objective ? prescriptive ? We will consider different ways of making moral decisions - Are the consequences of our actions most important ? or the principles we follow in making decisions ? or what kind of person we aspire to be ? Knowledge of Philosophy is not expected.

Marxist Philosophy in the 21 Century View details

There is more debate now about Marxist ideas than for some time, and it has been argued that these ideas are more relevant now than for some time. But 'Marxist' is often invoked - whether as praise or condemnation - but rarely examined or understood. This course is an opportunity to go behind the political rhetoric and gain an understanding of some of the core ideas in modern Marxist philosophy. We will study 1. hegemony (according to Gramsci) 2. domination and consumerism (according to Critical Theory) 3. women as the proletariat and 'reproductive labour' (in Marxist feminism) 4. nature and the 'second contradiction of capitalism' (in green Marxism) 5. the modern proletariat : zero hours contracts and the 'precariat' (in current Marxist economic theory)

Marxist Philosophy in the 21st Century: Day Course View details

There is more debate now about Marxist ideas than for some time, and it has been argued that these ideas are more relevant now than for some time. But 'Marxist' is often invoked - whether as praise or condemnation - but rarely examined or understood. This course is an opportunity to go behind the political rhetoric and gain an understanding of some of the core ideas in modern Marxist philosophy. We will study 1. hegemony (according to Gramsci) 2. domination and consumerism (according to Critical Theory) 3. women as the proletariat and 'reproductive labour' (in Marxist feminism) 4. nature and the 'second contradiction of capitalism' (in green Marxism) 5. the modern proletariat : zero hours contracts and the 'precariat' (in current Marxist economic theory)

Philosophers on Happiness View details

Not every philosopher agrees that happiness should be the aim in life, but many do. We'll explore the meaning of happiness through philosophers ancient and modern, who have advocated different versions of what it means to be happy and had different views about the role of happiness in human life. We will focus on Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC), Jeremy Bentham (1748 - 1832) and John Rawls (1921 - 2002). Aristotle and Bentham agreed that happiness is and should be the highest goal in life but had different interpretations of happiness, whereas Rawls' view was that freedom and justice rather than happiness should be the highest goals.

Philosophy View details

This Philosophy course is called Big Ideas. It is a course which takes in politics, philosophy, sociology, psychology and many sciences. It takes the ideas and work of a specific thinker and uses these as a framework for discussion and examination -- with special relevance to how we live our lives in the 21st Century. The course takes in lots of discussion and is very participative. It also allows participants to express their ideas in a very supportive and 'open' environment. Students make the final decisions on course content and planning.

Philosophy : How to have better arguments View details

Conflict and disagreement are seen by some as undesirable, while others (appear to) provoke them (on social media for example). Consensus and social harmony are seen by some as essential for a good life, while for others they are 'fake' because they deny the reality of social conflicts. Between those extremes, the course examines features of a helpful attitude to conflict - for example assuming that the other person/side have reasons for their views; that it can be harder for some to be heard; that 'listening to' does not have to mean 'agreeing with'. It questions the obligation to 'tolerate the intolerant'; provides some useful tools from argumentation theory to enable participants to think and present their ideas with greater clarity; and considers examples to distinguish between apparent and real conflicts. Where conflicts are real, it attempts to understand the source of the conflict - for example, incompatible fundamental values or interests.