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45 results in Literature Search again

Our literature classes range from novels to poetry to plays and we welcome participation from anyone who would like to learn more. You will have the chance to explore ideas with a wide range of other students and visits to the theatre or libraries are often a part of the course.

"The Auden Group": Poetry of the 1930s View details

1930s poetry was characterised by its engagement with the political challenge to liberal democracy in the run-up to WW2. The course explores, through discussion and analysis, a small selection of work by Auden, Spender, MacNeice and Day Lewis, known collectively as The Auden Group, who wrote in the hope that poetry could effect change.

Afternoon talk - Bird Poems of the Romantic Poets View details

he bird is traditionally an image of the poetic voice and, as such, held much appeal for poets of the Romantic period - and beyond. We shall read about the nightingale and the skylark, of course, but also the snipe and the owl, always looking to discover the poets’ perspective on each bird - from the ethereal to the terrestrial, from the fanciful to the carefully observed.

American Literature: The twentieth-century short story View details

Alongside our examination of a selection short stories from the John Updike edited collection. We will explore place, society, politics, culture, etc that helped shaped the stories and America itself over the 20th century.

Art and Poetry - Exeter View details

How have some of the great poets responded to art? This course examines a series of artworks then analyses the poems written in response. We will also consider art that responds to poetry. Includes Raphael, Tennyson, Browning, and Brueghel. There will be a case study of Keats’ Grecian Urn. No experience necessary.

Art and Poetry - Topsham View details

How have some of the great poets responded to art? This course examines a series of artworks then analyses the poems written in response. We will also consider art that responds to poetry. Includes Raphael, Tennyson, Browning, and Brueghel. There will also be a case study of Keats’ Grecian Urn. No experience necessary.

Australia: a Poetic Introduction View details

Poetry is often a marginalised art in contemporary Western societies but those involved in it tend to believe in its value passionately. This derives from the belief that poetry is the deepest form of human expression. This course is designed to increase students' understanding of Australian culture and identity through an examination of the poetry produced since white settlement . The course explores Australian poetry alongside the relationship this form of literary production has had to the social, aesthetic and cultural values of their period, and the way in which the perception of these poems have changed over time. Each week a different theme will be discussed and will include topics such as the building of an Australian identity, Australia at war, Indigenous Australia and Australia today. Student will also have the opportunity to bring poems they have found independently to the discussions to share with others on the course.

Branch Event - Birds and the Landscape in English Literature View details

Throughout the ages, English writers have responded to the landscape around them and the birds within it, reflecting contemporary ideas about both. Some wrote about the birds and places themselves, others used them as symbols of something else. Find out why Shakespeare's King Lear calls his daughter Goneril a "detested kite" and how Defoe's "wildest, most barren and frightful place" became Wordsworth's sublime inspiration, where a rainbow could make his "heart leap up."

Creative Writing- Developing Craft and Skills View details

The course will be based around reading a variety of poetry, fiction, drama and literary nonfiction. Alongside this students will be encouraged to develop and progress their own creative work in all of these genres through writing exercises prompted by these examples. Students, if they wish, will also be able to pursue an individual project over the duration of the course where they will be able to develop a portfolio of work in a specific area of interest or around a single work. Classes will be split into three sections: close reading and analysis, individual writing time and a workshop. Each week the group will critique students' work and read relevant contemporary and earlier examples of writing.

Day School: The Bronte Family of Haworth – a new look! View details

The Bronte family have attracted attention for over 155 years. Stories abound of the eccentric, repressive father, the drunken, drug-addicted, wastrel son and the unconventional, romantic daughters. More recent research, however, has shown that the story is not simply one of isolation and the writing of scandalous books: their home was a place of lively, creative activity, with family members alert to the literary, linguistic and cultural life of their time. All family members possessed artistic talent, whether it be writing novels, music, poetry, art, or a combination of these things. The course will consider not only the plots of some well-loved books (most of them the subject of many TV, radio and film adaptations), but the influences, tragedies and triumphs behind the Brontes' work. This will be set against a background of the cultural, social and economic background of the 19th century - a time of tremendous change in almost every sphere of life.

Day Schools: The Crystal Spirit: The Life and Works of George Orwell View details

We will explore the writings of George Orwell in the context of his interesting life and the social, political and historical times through which he lived and which greatly informed his fiction and non-fiction output. Texts to be studied will be as follows: His first book, 'Down and out in Paris and London' Other non-fiction works: 'The Road to Wigan Pier' 'Homage to Catalonia' 'The Lion and the Unicorn' The pre-War novels: 'Burmese Days' The Clergyman's Daughter' Keep the Aspidistra Flying' 'Coming Up for Air' The major post-War novels: 'Animal Farm' 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' In addition time will be given to consider some of his important shorter essays and journalism and poems.