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9 results in Architecture Appreciation Search again

Everyone is welcome to our architecture appreciation classes – no background knowledge is required, and you will have a chance to share ideas and learn more in our friendly and active architecture appreciation classes. Courses range from the study of architecture within a particular period, movement or style to architecture across continents.

Art and Architecture of Bristol View details

Bristol was once one of the great ports of Europe and the wealth that was accumulated was often spent on fine buildings. The city is rich in medieval architecture including two of the best late gothic churches – St Augustine’s and St Mary Redcliffe. There are also some fine examples of buildings associated with the port, from merchants’ houses to the villas built in Clifton in the eighteenth century. Bristol School painters recorded not just the dramatic landscape such as the Avon Gorge but also the social life of the town in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They are well represented in the City Museum and Art Gallery as part of a notable collection. By the nineteenth century the port was in decline but new building types arose and Bristol continued its role as a cultural and educational centre. We will examine these different aspects through the art and architecture still to be found in the city.

British Modern Masters: Neo-Romantics and Landscape View details

This course will investigate the developments in British art in the period following the horrors of the First World War, leading up to World War II and beyond. Many British artists abandoned the radical experiments of artists from the continent and explored instead the British landscape, in a variety of ways. Major artists to bediscussed include John Piper, Paul and John Nash, Graham Sutherland, Eric Ravilious and Stanley Spencer. The influence of the great British landscape painters of the past such as Turner, Constable, Blake and Palmer will be evaluated, along with a look at the contribution of printing.

Day School: The Architecture of France View details

France has been an extraordinary crossing point in European architecture - Romanesque pilgrimage churches en-route to Santiago de Compostela, Gothic style fanning out from the Île-de-France initially at St-Denis, Renaissance ideas arriving at Fontainebleau and the Louvre, the Sun King’s Versailles creating envy in Europe’s royal courts, and the Paris of Garnier’s Opéra and Eiffel’s Tower leading on to the twentieth century and Le Corbusier. We will conclude with a look at some of the latest architecture France has to offer.

France and England - The Migration of Cathedral Architecture View details

Architectural development in France had a direct impact on the great churches of England. The Romanesque of Normandy flowed into Canterbury and Edward the Confessor's Westminster, and William of Sens was to bring the Gothic of the Ile de France to Canterbury a century later. We will then consider how subsequent Gothic development took divergent paths, through High Gothic and Rayonnant in France, and from Early English to Perpendicular in England.

Introduction to Pevsner and the Tamar Perambulations View details

Saltash suffered badly from slum clearances after Pevsner's initial visit while he approved St Budeaux's inter-war housing developments. As well as looking at Pevsner, the scholar, we shall also consider the context for some of the architectural styles and changes he noted.

Introduction to Pevsner and the Tamar Perambulations View details

Saltash suffered badly from slum clearances after Pevsner's initial visit while he approved St Budeaux's inter-war housing developments. As well as looking at Pevsner, the scholar, we shall also consider the context for some of the architectural styles and changes he noted.

Pevsner Perambulation of Dursley, Gloucestershire (2002) View details

Explore aspects of history and architecture through the work of the architectural historian, Nikolaus Pevsner, in his Buildings of England series and consider perceptions of townscapes past and present. Learn about the buildings suggested as the most significant examples in the town. Students will be given information on the perambulation which they can conduct either after the talk or at any other time. Students will have opportunities both during the session and after to comment on selection and descriptions by the author as well as identify changes that have happened since publication and any omissions or corrections that they feel should be included.

World Heritage Architecture View details

Since UNESCO established the World Heritage Convention in 1972, 17 sites in England have qualified for their exceptional landscape or architecture. We will examine this World Heritage architecture, at places as varied as the Tower of London, Maritime Greenwich, Durham Castle and Blenheim Palace – and the Palace of Westminster, now facing a major and controversial restoration.

World Heritage Architecture in Mainland Europe View details

UNESCO’s designation of World Heritage in Europe now includes some of the world’s most extraordinary and varied architecture – our sampling of this will include Palermo and Monreale, Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan, Turin under the House of Savoy, Chartres, historic Lyon, Speyer’s cathedral, Lisbon’s Jerónimos monastery, Granada’s Alhambra and Rietveld’s Schröder House in Utrecht.