The Natural History of Freshwater Habitats

Ref: C2226699

Water is essential to life and rivers, marshes, lakes and gravel pits support many different organisms. Some are havens for both migratory or resident wintering wildfowl. What do these birds eat? Why not join this class to discover what lives on and in these waters and how as the days grow longer, the plants and animals found in wetlands adapt to the warmer days of summer. An outing to a freshwater site is part of the course.

Additional information about this course

Half term break on 19/02/2020

Course aim

Wetlands support many different organisms which are adapted to living within the aquatic environment. Students will be encouraged to discover some of them and make records of what they observe.

Do I need any particular skills or experience?

  • None other than an interest in the natural world

By the end of the course I should be able to:

  • State the importance of the main freshwater habitats within the catchments of the Lea and Roding Rivers and why they are excellent sites for overwintering water fowl.
  • Outline why water quality is important to all life forms, how to monitor this and how it can be improved.
  • Describe the importance of freshwater alage and other aquatic plants as the basis of food chains
  • Describe how to study aquatic invertebrates such as dragonflies or snails, Describe some of the threats to habitats and water conservation within the local catchments and mitigation measures being adopted overcome these threats.
  • Describe the importance of fish in wetland habitats

How will I be taught?

  • The WEA tutor will use a range of different teaching and learning methods and encourage you and the group to be actively involved in your learning
  • Students will be encouraged to make their own observations about the natural world and to engage with any relevant citizen science projects to help monitor the local environments.

What kind of feedback can I expect?

  • A range of informal activities will be used by the tutor to see what you are learning which may include quizzes, question and answer, small projects and discussion
  • You will have opportunities to discuss your progress with your tutor
  • All students will be encouraged to read widely, to make observations and share these with others and to particpate in relevant citizen science projects to help monitor local environments.

What else do I need to know?

  • Nothing else is needed
  • Students will be encouraged to take photographs of plants and animals

Pre-course work, reading and information sources

  • No pre reading or pre course work is required

What can I do next?

  • Progress to another WEA course
  • Progress to a course with another provider
  • Become involved as a volunteer for a WEA partner or another organisation
  • Students are encouraged to partipate in relevant citizen science projects to help monitor the local environment

Download full course information sheet

The Natural History of Freshwater Habitats

Enrolment Conditions

As a registered charity, and to meet our funders’ requirements, we need to check a few things with you before you book. Please could we ask that you check the list below to ensure you meet our basic criteria:

  • You are paying the standard fee (with a credit or debit card) or you are on any of the qualifying benefits
  • You have a valid email address so that you can receive confirmation of your booking
  • You have been resident in the UK, EU or EEA for the last 3 years
  • You are aged 19 years or older on 1st September 2019
  • You have read and accept our standard terms and conditions

Not sure or have further questions? Contact courseenquiries@wea.org.uk

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