Black People's Long Struggle Against Racism in America

Ref: C2419262

The ancestors of most African Americans arrived as slaves. From the start they resisted being at the bottom of society. The first person to die in the War of independence was a black man, Crispus Attucks. Black people were crucial in the Civil War and in the period of Radical Reconstruction that came after, when Mississippi returned its first black senator in 1870. Each week discussion will be accompanied by music, slide presentations and film clips. The course will look at leaders including Harriet Tubman, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. It will look at attacks from the Ku Klux Klan, but also people who allied themselves to black people from the Populists in the 1890s, through the Communist Party to the Democrats. It will travel from the slave rebellion of Nat Turner to the presidency of Barack Obama and the Black Lives Matter movement.

Course aim

Understand how people of African descent have shaped their own role in US society through resistance to slavery and racism.

Who is the course for?

- No skills or experience needed

What topics will this course cover

- The WEA tutor will use a range of different teaching and learning methods and encourage you and the group to be actively involved in your learning

What will it be like?

WEA classes are friendly and supportive. You will be encouraged to work together with your fellow students and tutor. You will be asked to share your ideas and views in the class and work with the group to give and accept feedback in a supportive environment. The WEA tutor will use a range of different teaching and learning methods and encourage you to be actively involved in your learning. You may be asked to undertake work to support your course outside of your class.

By the end of the course I should be able to:

1) List the key changes in black experience through US history 2) Explain changes in government policy towards the black minority 3) Identify the major shifts in the fight against racism in the US 4) Name and understand the ideas of the main black leaders

How will I know I'm making progress?

- A range of informal activities will be used by the tutor to see what you are learning which may include quizzes, question and answer, small projects and discussion - You will have opportunities to discuss your progress with your tutor

What else do I need to know, do or bring?

- It will be helpful for you if you can make notes

Reading and information sources

- No prior reading is necessary. However Fergus M Bordewich's ‘Bound For Canaan’, James M McPherson's ‘Battle Cry of Freedom’, Jean M Humez's ‘Harriet Tubman’ and Stephen Tuck’s ‘We Ain’t What We Ought to Be’ are good background books.

What could the course lead to?

- Progress to another WEA course - Progress to a course with another provider

Download full course outline

Black People's Long Struggle Against Racism in America Course Outline

Enrolment Conditions

You can enrol online if you meet all of the following requirements:

  • are paying the standard fee or are on any of the qualifying benefits
  • are paying with a credit/debit card or are not paying a fee because of a qualifying benefit
  • have a valid email address
  • have been resident in the UK, EU or EEA for the last 3 years
  • are aged 19 years or older on 1st September 2017
  • have read and accept the standard terms and conditions
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